WHEN IT COMES TO KITTENS, EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED.

So you’re about to be the proud parent of a little bundle of fur? Congrats! Kittens are seriously fun, but they can surprise you in a lot of ways. Like, how the heck did they knock that over? Or why won’t they use this litter box or eat this food? The good news is we’ve seen it all. Here’s what you need to know.

THE NEW KITTEN GUIDE

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CAT-PROOF YOUR PLACE

- Cover electric outlets and exposed wires

- Clean up small items that could be swallowed

- Move breakable items

- Put cleaning products and pesticides baits away

- Tie up blinds and curtain cords

-If you have a yard and plan to let your cat outside, consider a fence or enclosure

- Keep toilet lids down and dryer door closed

- Get rid of poisonous plants

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BE READY TO BRING THEM HOME

Kittens are small, but trust us, this will go a lot easier with a kitty carrier on hand. You’ll also want to have collar and ID tag waiting — breakaway collars are the safest options for cats. If you want to leash train your kitten (yes, we said leash, cats like walks too), it’s best to start them young with a kitty harness as well.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TRANSITION THEIR FOOD

Kittens need a chance to get used to any diet changes, so keep some of the food they’re used to on hand and stick with the same type of protein in their first new bag as well. A probiotic will smooth out any digestive woes plus improve their gut health and strengthen their immune system. Follow the instructions below, and remember if you’re switching them to a raw, freeze-dried raw or dehydrated diet, you’ll want to go even slower.

Here’s how the transition should go:
Days 1-2—75% old/25% new
Days 3-5—50 old/50 new
Days 5-7—25% old/75% new
Days 7-10—only continue to transition if transition has been difficult.

TRY: 

Honest Kitchen Perfect Form Herbal Digestive Supplement

Weruva Pumpkin Patch Up!

Bell Rock Growers Organic Pet Greens Garden - Self Grow Kit

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BUILD THE RIGHT DIET

Need help deciding what kind of food to switch your kitten to? Cats are carnivores, so look for food with meat as the first ingredient. Then, make sure it has lots of moisture. Unlike dogs, felines get most of their water from what they eat. Canned, raw, or freeze dried (and rehydrated) foods are all good options. Save the kibble for between-meal grazing. Kittens grow (and eat) a lot in their first year, so feed them by the specific guidelines on the packaging. Now is also the time to vary the brands and protein sources as much as possible. It provides them with more nutrients and prevents them from becoming picky eaters. Serve dinner up in a wide, shallow bowl —cats hate when their whiskers touch the sides because it can lead to whisker fatigue. Lastly, consider a water fountain to entice them into a little extra hydration.

TRY:

PureVita Grain Free Turkey Entree

Primal Freeze Dried Chicken & Salmon Formula

Honest Kitchen Pro Bloom Instant Powdered Goat Milk With Probiotics

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HANDLE LITTER BOX DRAMA

First off, if you have more than one cat, everyone gets their own box, including new kitten (cats are very territorial). It's even recommended to have one more litter box than cats for a multi-cat household. Keep the litter box in a secluded spot of the area you’ve cat-proofed, far away from disturbing noises or smell-amplifying heat. Don’t be surprised if your kitten doesn’t like the first box you bring home. They come in a variety of shapes and sizes for this very reason. Try placing kitten in it after naps or shortly after meals. Help them figure things out by taking their paw and lightly digging. Try switching litter types and get a pet-specific stain cleaner for accidents — it removes odors so the same spot doesn’t get marked again.

TRY:

SmartCat Ultimate Litter Box

Skout's Honor Cat Urine & Odor Destroyer

Dr Elseys Ultra Litter Attractant

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GIVE THEM THEIR OWN FURNITURE

If you don’t want your new kitten testing their claws on your couch, invest in a scratching post. And while you’re at it, they’re going to need their own place to hang out, including a bed of their own (remember what we said about being territorial?). Cat cave beds let them hide to feel secure and cat trees and towers are great for perching. Just remember, nothing too high since they’re very little.

TRY:

K&H Pet Products Scratch Ramp And Track Cardboard Toy 

K&H Pet Products Self Warming Kitty Sack

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

GROOM REGULARLY

Hairballs happen. But reducing their likelihood starts with regular brushing. Long hair, don’t care does not apply here – long-haired cats need even more regular at-home brushing and grooming. Also, starting them young with a brush and comb to get used to everything will save you from years of bites and scratches.

TRY:

FURminator Soft Slicker Brush

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

CHOOSE HEALTHY TREATS

Who can resist spoiling a face this cute? The trick is to make sure you’re getting treats that add extra nutrients to your pet’s diet instead of empty calories. But no matter what, be careful not to overdo it.

TRY:

Honest Kitchen Wishes Fish Filets 

Orijen Original Formula Cat Treats

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

INVEST IN REAL TOYS

Kittens are little balls of energy that LOVE to play with anything. But household objects like yarn and string can really hurt them if swallowed. Invest in age-appropriate solo toys and interactive toys to keep them busy. Most cats ignore catnip or silvervine until six to 12 months old, but then it’s a great play enhancer that they’ll be low-key obsessed with.

TRY:

Duckyworld Catnip Banana

Cat Claws I.C.A.T.S. Wand - Wacky Wand

Ethical Colorful Springs Thin

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TRY A SUPPLEMENT

There are all-natural supplements to help with almost any cat health problem. You may want to consider hairball remedy, probiotics for digestion, immune support, and urinary support (cats are prone to UTI’s). A calming aid can also help with adjusting to their new home. After all it’s hard being a little kitty in a big new world.

TRY:

Pet Naturals Hairball Control Chews

Honest Kitchen Perfect Form Herbal Digestive Supplement

 

 

 

 

 

So you’re about to be the proud parent of a little bundle of fur? Congrats! Kittens are seriously fun, but they can surprise you in a lot of ways. Like, how the heck did they knock that over? Or why won’t they use this litter box or eat this food? The good news is we’ve seen it all. Here’s what you need to know.


CAT-PROOF YOUR PLACE

  • Cover electric outlets and exposed wires
  • Move breakable items
  • Tie up blinds and curtain cords
  • Keep toilet lids down and dryer door closed
  • Clean up small items that could be swallowed
  • Put cleaning products and pesticides baits away
  • If you have a yard and plan to let your cat outside, consider a fence or enclosure
  • Get rid of poisonous plants

BE READY TO BRING THEM HOME

Kittens are small, but trust us, this will go a lot easier with a kitty carrier on hand. You’ll also want to have collar and ID tag waiting — breakaway collars are the safest options for cats. If you want to leash train your kitten (yes, we said leash, cats like walks too), it’s best to start them young with a kitty harness as well.


TRANSITION THEIR FOOD

Kittens need a chance to get used to any diet changes, so keep some of the food they’re used to on hand and stick with the same type of protein in their first new bag as well. A probiotic will smooth out any digestive woes plus improve their gut health and strengthen their immune system. Follow the instructions below, and remember if you’re switching them to a raw, freeze-dried raw or dehydrated diet, you’ll want to go even slower.

Here’s how the transition should go:
Days 1-2—75% old/25% new
Days 3-5—50 old/50 new
Days 5-7—25% old/75% new
Days 7-10—only continue to transition if transition has been difficult.

TRY: 

  1. Pumpkin Patch Up! Pureed Pumpkin
    Pumpkin Patch Up! Pureed Pumpkin
    As low as $0.89

BUILD THE RIGHT DIET

Need help deciding what kind of food to switch your kitten to? Cats are carnivores, so look for food with meat as the first ingredient. Then, make sure it has lots of moisture. Unlike dogs, felines get most of their water from what they eat. Canned, raw, or freeze dried (and rehydrated) foods are all good options. Save the kibble for between-meal grazing. Kittens grow (and eat) a lot in their first year, so feed them by the specific guidelines on the packaging. Now is also the time to vary the brands and protein sources as much as possible. It provides them with more nutrients and prevents them from becoming picky eaters. Serve dinner up in a wide, shallow bowl —cats hate when their whiskers touch the sides because it can lead to whisker fatigue. Lastly, consider a water fountain to entice them into a little extra hydration.

TRY:

  1. Air-Dried Beef Recipe For Cats
    Air-Dried Beef Recipe For Cats
    As low as $21.99

HANDLE LITTER BOX DRAMA

First off, if you have more than one cat, everyone gets their own box, including new kitten (cats are very territorial). It's even recommended to have one more litter box than cats for a multi-cat household. Keep the litter box in a secluded spot of the area you’ve cat-proofed, far away from disturbing noises or smell-amplifying heat. Don’t be surprised if your kitten doesn’t like the first box you bring home. They come in a variety of shapes and sizes for this very reason. Try placing kitten in it after naps or shortly after meals. Help them figure things out by taking their paw and lightly digging. Try switching litter types and get a pet-specific stain cleaner for accidents — it removes odors so the same spot doesn’t get marked again.

TRY:


GIVE THEM THEIR OWN FURNITURE

If you don’t want your new kitten testing their claws on your couch, invest in a scratching post. And while you’re at it, they’re going to need their own place to hang out, including a bed of their own (remember what we said about being territorial?). Cat cave beds let them hide to feel secure and cat trees and towers are great for perching. Just remember, nothing too high since they’re very little.

TRY:


GROOM REGULARLY

Hairballs happen. But reducing their likelihood starts with regular brushing. Long hair, don’t care does not apply here – long-haired cats need even more regular at-home brushing and grooming. Also, starting them young with a brush and comb to get used to everything will save you from years of bites and scratches.

TRY:

  1. Short Hair Cat Undercoat deShedding Tool
    Short Hair Cat Undercoat deShedding Tool
    As low as $39.99
  2. Soft Slicker Brush Small
    Soft Slicker Brush
    As low as $17.99
  3. Long Hair Cat Undercoat deShedding Tool
    Long Hair Cat Undercoat deShedding Tool
    As low as $39.99

CHOOSE HEALTHY TREATS

Who can resist spoiling a face this cute? The trick is to make sure you’re getting treats that add extra nutrients to your pet’s diet instead of empty calories. But no matter what, be careful not to overdo it.

TRY:


INVEST IN REAL TOYS

Kittens are little balls of energy that LOVE to play with anything. But household objects like yarn and string can really hurt them if swallowed. Invest in age-appropriate solo toys and interactive toys to keep them busy. Most cats ignore catnip or silvervine until six to 12 months old, but then it’s a great play enhancer that they’ll be low-key obsessed with.

TRY:


TRY A SUPPLEMENT

There are all-natural supplements to help with almost any cat health problem. You may want to consider hairball remedy, probiotics for digestion, immune support, and urinary support (cats are prone to UTI’s). A calming aid can also help with adjusting to their new home. After all it’s hard being a little kitty in a big new world.

TRY:

  1. Hairball Control Chews 70 count
    Hairball Control Chews
    As low as $6.99

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