Don’t touch that. Or lick that. Or eat that. Get to know the human things that could poison your pet.

Pets are curious creatures and as their humans, it’s important to be aware of the things we may have around that could harm them. There are surprising, everyday food items and plants that can actually poison your pet. We put together a list of some of the most common toxic foods for pets. There’s also a list of yummy alternatives because there’s so much that they can enjoy!

TRY THIS

NOT THAT

Peanut butter made just for pets. They’ll feel special.

Human Peanut Butter

Many types of peanut butter contain Xylitol, which can cause insulin release and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in most species, which can lead to liver failure. Initial signs of toxicosis include vomiting, lethargy and loss of coordination. Signs can progress to seizures and elevated liver enzymes and liver failure can be seen within a few days.

Healthy sweet treats.

Grapes and Raisins

While healthy for humans, these fruits can cause kidney failure in pets. Not much is known about why this happens, but it’s best to avoid feeding grapes and raisins to dogs.

Equally crunchy, minus the toxicity.

Nuts

Nuts, including almonds, pecans, and walnuts, contain high amounts of oils and fats. The fats can cause vomiting, diarrhea and potentially pancreatitis in pets.

Macadamia nuts can cause weakness, depression, vomiting, tremors and hyperthermia in dogs. Signs usually appear within 12 hours of ingestion and can last approximately 24 to 48 hours.

Drinks for dogs.

Caffeine Drinks or Alcohol

Chocolate, coffee and caffeine products all contain substances called methylxanthines. These can cause vomiting and diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death in pets.

Alcoholic beverages and food products containing alcohol can cause vomiting, diarrhea, decreased coordination, central nervous system depression, difficulty breathing, tremors, abnormal blood acidity, coma and even death. Under no circumstances should your pet be given any alcohol.

If you suspect that your pet has ingested alcohol, contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center immediately.

Food they’ll love. Some even have vegetables.

Plenty of canned food with pumpkin, potato, carrots and more

Onions, Garlic, Chives

Kind of surprising, right? These vegetables can cause gastrointestinal irritation and could lead to red blood cell damage and anemia in pets.

Raw food, made specially for pets.

Raw pet food can balance your pet’s nutritional need and is created under strict safety standards. The best brands have thoughtfully sourced proteins (no hormones or antibiotics), high standards for handling raw meat and species appropriate recipes for cats and dogs.

Our favorite raw brands include:

Stella & Chewy's

TikiCat Raw

Open Farm

Primal

Vital Essentials

Raw & Undercooked Meat, Meant for Humans


The meat you purchase for you and your family at the grocery store is intended to be cooked as it may contain bacteria such as Salmonella and E. coli.


Raw meat and raw eggs can contain bacteria such as Salmonella and E. coli. Raw eggs also contain an enzyme called avidin that decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin), which can lead to skin and coat problems.

Pet food companies have multiple levels of safety procedures and checks in place to avoid bacteria reaching your home. Unlike human food, pet food has a zero-tolerance policy for pathogens in raw food.

Cat-Friendly Toys & Treats.

Keep your cat too busy to notice the plant.

Your pet could also be craving greens.

House Plants

Look but don’t touch. Many plant species are toxic to pets. Check out a more comprehensive list.

Similar taste, no tummy troubles.

Try these milk alternatives

Milk

Because pets can’t easily break down lactose, milk and dairy-based products cause an upset stomach.

Remember, before you feed your pet, be sure to do your research. If you have any questions, come visit us in store to talk with one of our Pet Foodies or speak to your veterinarian.

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